World Cancer Day

 

Sunday, 4th February was World Cancer Day and Brisbane joined other major cities across the globe to paint the world orange and blue and what a wonderful display it was. My photo, shot for ICON Group, made the header and top of the page of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and the Landmark Lighting Report.  What an honour! Other submissions included the Empire State Building; Niagara Falls; Petra, Jordan; Italy; Switzerland and many more.

There were other photographers about as people occupied picnic tables and blankets at Wilson’s Outlook; a magnificent spot to enjoy dinner with a view. A black curtain languished behind the city buildings and I thought we’d get a downpour but the clouds eventually lifted, and once again the Story Bridge shone brightly sending a positive message to the world.

It was a fun shoot and an absolute privilege to be a part of this great worldwide event. Visit the UICC page and see all the World Cancer Day photos here

World Cancer Day

City Clutter

The Albert Street Uniting Church in Brisbane is a beautiful old church that was originally a Methodist church. It was built in the late 1800’s and opened on 8th November 1889. Although it once stood alone in its grandeur, it still stands out amongst the skyscrapers, a rose among the thorns.

The Victorian Gothic Revival building is built of red brick, trimmed with white Oamaru limestone and a slate roof. The church continues with services and is a popular wedding venue today. This is one of my favourite buildings in Brisbane.

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The Tower of Power

1 William Street, Brisbane, AKA The Tower of Power, is a government administration building which was completed in October 2016. A very nice addition to the city’s skyline.

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Jacaranda

The Jacaranda trees are in full bloom in Brisbane right now. It is Spring here and the city is bursting in purple blooms in tree-lined streets and dottings in and around the city. It is a magical time of year and the quintessential image of Brisbane. Adding to that magic is a lovely purple blanket of fallen blossoms. Traditionally signalling the beginning of the exam season, it is said that if you haven’t started studying by the time the trees are bursting then you are doomed.

The Brisbane City Botanic Gardens is the site of Australia’s first grown Jacaranda tree and was depicted in the 1903 painting by Richard Godfrey Rivers titled “Under the Jacaranda Tree”. The painting is of the artist and his wife Selina taking tea under the tree. That tree was a Brisbane landmark until it was knocked over by a cyclone in 1980.

I am grateful to Walter Hill  who planted the first tree here in 1864. He was at the time the superintendent of Brisbane’s Botanic Gardens and obtained the Jacaranda seed from Brazil via the Australian wheat ships that traded with South America. It has brought so much beauty to our city.

Here’s a poem I wrote a few years back:

Jacaranda

September blooms of purple hues,
adorn the city street.
And in bright splendour praises Spring,
where limbs and feathers meet.

Amid soft purple hues I lay,
to rest my weary head.
In fantasies drifting away,
upon a sprinkled spread.

Copyright © October 2011 Norma Martiri

aaatrees
Under the Jacaranda Tree by Richard Godfrey Rivers 1903
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General Douglas MacArthur

When I was a young 16 yo girl, my very first office job entailed picking up the company’s mail from the General Post Office at the bottom end of Queen Street and then walking back to the top end to start my work day as a Junior Clerk Typist slogging away at those big old typewriters. On cold days the Westerly wind stung as it whipped in and out of the tall buildings and walking that distance in heels was torture.

Every day I walked past MacArthur Chambers and it fascinated me. I knew a little about its history and in time I learnt its significance. (Learning back then was a slower process because we actually had to go to the library to read books or ask those who were older and wiser.) I don’t know why it fascinated me so; I wasn’t consciously  interested in the war but it was the 70’s and the war hadn’t long been over, or maybe it was because I was young and in awe of Americans back then.

I learnt that General Douglas MacArthur occupied the offices on the eighth floor in Brisbane from July 1942 to November 1944 and lived at the Lennon’s Hotel. This is now a museum dedicated to his occupation.

On the weekend I visited the MacArthur Museum and still found it fascinating. I managed to take some photos of his office as it would have been set up when occupied and to my surprise the attendant offered to let me sit in the chair behind that big desk. Powerful!!

There is so much to see and learn, lots of reading and well worth the visit. It is certainly a great tribute to a great man. I don’t believe in warfare but do I believe that we can learn from history, and in a perfect world, never repeat mistakes of the past.

Learn more about General MacArthur’s Brisbane occupation here

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